STEFFANLAND
This was the cover art to the 300th mailing of the Fantasy Amateur Press Association aka FAPA, a small press organization started in 1938, I believe, by Donald A Wolheim and others to distribute early science fiction fanzines in quarterly bundles to all of its members.  FAPA — once known as the Elephant’s Graveyard for sf fans — is still coming out on schedule to this day.  This artwork was used as a frontispiece, of sorts, to all the other zines assembled in that anniversary mailing.
Once again, this one was good for working on my computer coloring skills.  It was based on a sketch from more than 10 years earlier that I had always liked, but never finished.

This was the cover art to the 300th mailing of the Fantasy Amateur Press Association aka FAPA, a small press organization started in 1938, I believe, by Donald A Wolheim and others to distribute early science fiction fanzines in quarterly bundles to all of its members.  FAPA — once known as the Elephant’s Graveyard for sf fans — is still coming out on schedule to this day.  This artwork was used as a frontispiece, of sorts, to all the other zines assembled in that anniversary mailing.

Once again, this one was good for working on my computer coloring skills.  It was based on a sketch from more than 10 years earlier that I had always liked, but never finished.

This was the cover for the eighth issue of Dr. Rob Jackson’s occasional fanzine, Inca.  It is my biggest attempt to venture into the steampunk arena and I enjoyed it because I got to do some research on the clothes and other things, like the flying machine.  This is also one of my most detailed and needlessly complex drawings, but it’s fun nonetheless.

This was the cover for the eighth issue of Dr. Rob Jackson’s occasional fanzine, Inca.  It is my biggest attempt to venture into the steampunk arena and I enjoyed it because I got to do some research on the clothes and other things, like the flying machine.  This is also one of my most detailed and needlessly complex drawings, but it’s fun nonetheless.

I was asked in late 2011 to design the award certificate for the annual Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contributions to the culture of science fiction fandom.  The certificate was presented the following spring at the 2012 Corflu in Las Vegas, NV. 
Being one who doesn’t take awards or prizes too seriously, I chose to produce a certificate in keeping with that attitude.  It is a very silly award, indeed.  Nevertheless, the recipient was quite pleased to receive it and I was quite pleased to draw it.  Plus, it was an opportunity for me to work on my computer coloring skills, which is quite time consuming and infuriating, especially when you do it the way I do it — without really knowing what the hell I’m doing.
Still, pretty colors…

I was asked in late 2011 to design the award certificate for the annual Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contributions to the culture of science fiction fandom.  The certificate was presented the following spring at the 2012 Corflu in Las Vegas, NV. 

Being one who doesn’t take awards or prizes too seriously, I chose to produce a certificate in keeping with that attitude.  It is a very silly award, indeed.  Nevertheless, the recipient was quite pleased to receive it and I was quite pleased to draw it.  Plus, it was an opportunity for me to work on my computer coloring skills, which is quite time consuming and infuriating, especially when you do it the way I do it — without really knowing what the hell I’m doing.

Still, pretty colors…

Oh, dear.  I have been asleep for such a long time.  Time to wake the fuck up and post some new artwork for enjoyment of all my fan — I used to have two of them, but Mom’s no longer with us…
Anyway, I’ve been busy while I was gone.  I drew a 21 page comic strip that’s coming out in a book in April 2014, I was the chairman of a science fiction convention — the 30th Corflu, in 2013 — which included designing logos, t-shirts, drink coasters, posters, and two publications.  All during that time I was also providing a few covers and illustrations for small press publishers, among other things.  I’ve missed you.
So the first image I’ve decided to post upon my return is the wraparound cover I drew for the 50th issue of Banana Wings, a smart and articulate science fiction fanzine from the UK.  It is one of my favorite drawings of the past few years.

Oh, dear.  I have been asleep for such a long time.  Time to wake the fuck up and post some new artwork for enjoyment of all my fan — I used to have two of them, but Mom’s no longer with us…

Anyway, I’ve been busy while I was gone.  I drew a 21 page comic strip that’s coming out in a book in April 2014, I was the chairman of a science fiction convention — the 30th Corflu, in 2013 — which included designing logos, t-shirts, drink coasters, posters, and two publications.  All during that time I was also providing a few covers and illustrations for small press publishers, among other things.  I’ve missed you.

So the first image I’ve decided to post upon my return is the wraparound cover I drew for the 50th issue of Banana Wings, a smart and articulate science fiction fanzine from the UK.  It is one of my favorite drawings of the past few years.

Yet another entry in a series of column headings I’ll be posting for The Ether Still Vibrates, which I occasionally produce for Robert Lichtman’s Trap Door.  Having the opportunity to repeatedly provide illustrations like this allows me to explore different kinds of decorative eye candy, and gives me an excuse to play with various styles of hand lettering, a difficult skill that I take a lot of pleasure in.

Yet another entry in a series of column headings I’ll be posting for The Ether Still Vibrates, which I occasionally produce for Robert Lichtman’s Trap Door.  Having the opportunity to repeatedly provide illustrations like this allows me to explore different kinds of decorative eye candy, and gives me an excuse to play with various styles of hand lettering, a difficult skill that I take a lot of pleasure in.

Here’s another in a series of column headings I’ll be posting for The Ether Still Vibrates, which I occasionally produce for Robert Lichtman’s Trap Door.  Having the opportunity to repeatedly provide illustrations like this allows me to explore different kinds of decorative eye candy, and gives me an excuse to play with various styles of hand lettering, a difficult skill that I take a lot of pleasure in.

Here’s another in a series of column headings I’ll be posting for The Ether Still Vibrates, which I occasionally produce for Robert Lichtman’s Trap Door.  Having the opportunity to repeatedly provide illustrations like this allows me to explore different kinds of decorative eye candy, and gives me an excuse to play with various styles of hand lettering, a difficult skill that I take a lot of pleasure in.

This is the first in a series of column headings I’ll be posting for The Ether Still Vibrates, which I occasionally produce for Robert Lichtman’s Trap Door.  Having the opportunity to repeatedly provide illustrations like this allows me to explore different kinds of decorative eye candy, and gives me an excuse to play with various styles of hand lettering, a difficult skill that I take a lot of pleasure in.

This is the first in a series of column headings I’ll be posting for The Ether Still Vibrates, which I occasionally produce for Robert Lichtman’s Trap Door.  Having the opportunity to repeatedly provide illustrations like this allows me to explore different kinds of decorative eye candy, and gives me an excuse to play with various styles of hand lettering, a difficult skill that I take a lot of pleasure in.

Here’s another science fictional drawing done in the Art Deco style.  Called Space Medusa, it appeared as a cover on Robert Lichtman’s Trapdoor.  Yes, that’s old skool zip-a-tone, too.  I enjoy the idea of a retro-futuristic view of the worlds of tomorrow.

Here’s another science fictional drawing done in the Art Deco style.  Called Space Medusa, it appeared as a cover on Robert Lichtman’s Trapdoor.  Yes, that’s old skool zip-a-tone, too.  I enjoy the idea of a retro-futuristic view of the worlds of tomorrow.

I’ve been fascinated by Art Deco for a long time and this illustration, Space Deco Dance, was one of several pieces I did in that style.  Though rarely used in science fiction, I have been interested in combining the two for quite a while and did several fanzine covers that featured this highly streamlined graphic style.  This one appeared as a cover on Robert Lichtman’s Trapdoor.

I’ve been fascinated by Art Deco for a long time and this illustration, Space Deco Dance, was one of several pieces I did in that style.  Though rarely used in science fiction, I have been interested in combining the two for quite a while and did several fanzine covers that featured this highly streamlined graphic style.  This one appeared as a cover on Robert Lichtman’s Trapdoor.

This illustration, called Cockpit, was drawn in the months approaching the 30th anniversary of the death of my mentor Vaughn Bode.  I met him when I was a teenager and knew him for the last five years of his life.  We both lived in Syracuse, New York and I followed him into the Syracuse University College of Art in 1971, where I ended up with some of the same professors that had taught him five years earlier — though I learned far more from him than I did at school.  As the anniversary of his death approached, I decided to create this illustration that paid homage to him and his love of aircraft technology.  Though he drew in a cartoonish style, his attention to realistic detail was intense and gave his work a believability that was unexpected and eye catching.  I drew this with him in mind.  It was published as the cover to the eleventh issue of Chunga in January 2006.

This illustration, called Cockpit, was drawn in the months approaching the 30th anniversary of the death of my mentor Vaughn Bode.  I met him when I was a teenager and knew him for the last five years of his life.  We both lived in Syracuse, New York and I followed him into the Syracuse University College of Art in 1971, where I ended up with some of the same professors that had taught him five years earlier — though I learned far more from him than I did at school.  As the anniversary of his death approached, I decided to create this illustration that paid homage to him and his love of aircraft technology.  Though he drew in a cartoonish style, his attention to realistic detail was intense and gave his work a believability that was unexpected and eye catching.  I drew this with him in mind.  It was published as the cover to the eleventh issue of Chunga in January 2006.